fbpx

Stress Awareness Month: 4 Ways Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Can Help Combat Stress

It’s well documented that exercise reduces stress, and as a highly effective form of exercise, Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is a not only a great tool for self-defence and a competitive sport, it’s also on hand to keep your stress levels in check. The benefits of martial arts training are vast, but in light of Stress Awareness Month this April, we wanted to highlight some of the key reasons Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is a great option to get your stress under control.

Physical Activity

Jiu Jitsu offers immense physicality in the form of takedowns, close combat ground fighting and grappling, all of which build good aerobic and anaerobic capacity. Thanks to the competitive element of Jiu Jitsu, you’ll find that you quickly improve both strength and endurance through your time on the mats. Whether it’s the intensity of specific training or some tough rounds after class, most students will testify that there’s no buzz quite like it.

Finding Strength Under Pressure

As well as giving you an excellent workout, Jiu Jitsu also gives you opportunities to experience and work your way out of high-pressure situations. Positions such as the mount, knee on belly, joint locks and chokes are the bread and butter of Jiu Jitsu, and whilst these situations are stressful, you’ll be taught techniques and movements to survive and ultimately escape them, regardless of the size of your opponent. This in turn builds your confidence, and you’ll soon notice parallels with the everyday challenges of life; that with enough perseverance and composure, you can eliminate stress factors within your control.

Focus, Concentration and Patience

Focus and concentration in class doesn’t just present a distraction from everyday life, it’ll demonstrate that Jiu Jitsu requires a lot of patience and strategic thinking. Whilst many martial arts offer regular gradings, Jiu Jitsu lacks frequent new belt gratification. Instead, you’ll find pleasure in new techniques, deeper understanding of Jiu Jitsu as a sport, and on-going strategic improvements to your game. Effectively, your mind is taken away from the promise of an instant reward, and instead focuses on the process of self-improvement.

Community

Regular training ensures you build positive relationships with other club members. The Jiu Jitsu community is diverse and welcoming, and prides itself on being accessible to everyone. There is no required level of fitness to get started, and it doesn’t matter if you’re 6 or 60, there will always be a place on the mats for you!

The NHS recommends connecting with others as a key stress management tool, and there is daily opportunities to meet a range of different people in a community that is ready to welcome you.

New to Brazilian Jiu Jitsu?

Learning something new is a great way of managing stress, according to Professor Cary Cooper, as featured on the NHS website:

Setting yourself goals and challenges, whether at work or outside, such as learning a new language or a new sport, helps build confidence. This will help you deal with stress.

“By continuing to learn, you become more emotionally resilient as a person”

If you’d like to arrange a free trial and meet the team, get in touch today.

Stress Awareness Month: 4 Ways Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Can Help Combat Stress

It’s well documented that exercise reduces stress, and as a highly effective form of exercise, Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is a not only a great tool for self-defence and a competitive sport, it’s also on hand to keep your stress levels in check. The benefits of martial arts training are vast, but in light of Stress Awareness Month this April, we wanted to highlight some of the key reasons Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is a great option to get your stress under control.

Physical Activity

Jiu Jitsu offers immense physicality in the form of takedowns, close combat ground fighting and grappling, all of which build good aerobic and anaerobic capacity. Thanks to the competitive element of Jiu Jitsu, you’ll find that you quickly improve both strength and endurance through your time on the mats. Whether it’s the intensity of specific training or some tough rounds after class, most students will testify that there’s no buzz quite like it.

Finding Strength Under Pressure

As well as giving you an excellent workout, Jiu Jitsu also gives you opportunities to experience and work your way out of high-pressure situations. Positions such as the mount, knee on belly, joint locks and chokes are the bread and butter of Jiu Jitsu, and whilst these situations are stressful, you’ll be taught techniques and movements to survive and ultimately escape them, regardless of the size of your opponent. This in turn builds your confidence, and you’ll soon notice parallels with the everyday challenges of life; that with enough perseverance and composure, you can eliminate stress factors within your control.

Focus, Concentration and Patience

Focus and concentration in class doesn’t just present a distraction from everyday life, it’ll demonstrate that Jiu Jitsu requires a lot of patience and strategic thinking. Whilst many martial arts offer regular gradings, Jiu Jitsu lacks frequent new belt gratification. Instead, you’ll find pleasure in new techniques, deeper understanding of Jiu Jitsu as a sport, and on-going strategic improvements to your game. Effectively, your mind is taken away from the promise of an instant reward, and instead focuses on the process of self-improvement.

Community

Regular training ensures you build positive relationships with other club members. The Jiu Jitsu community is diverse and welcoming, and prides itself on being accessible to everyone. There is no required level of fitness to get started, and it doesn’t matter if you’re 6 or 60, there will always be a place on the mats for you!

The NHS recommends connecting with others as a key stress management tool, and there is daily opportunities to meet a range of different people in a community that is ready to welcome you.

New to Brazilian Jiu Jitsu?

Learning something new is a great way of managing stress, according to Professor Cary Cooper, as featured on the NHS website:

Setting yourself goals and challenges, whether at work or outside, such as learning a new language or a new sport, helps build confidence. This will help you deal with stress.

“By continuing to learn, you become more emotionally resilient as a person”

If you’d like to arrange a free trial and meet the team, get in touch today.

Share This